‘Tis the Season for Consumer Spending?

December 02, 2021

Line chart showing the personal savings rate and personal consumption amongst Americans. Chart subtitle: Personal savings rates have retreated from pandemic-induced highs, however several potential headwinds still face the American consumer this holiday season Chart description: Y-axis ranges from -15% to +30%. X-axis shows quarters from 3Q16 to 3Q21. Line for Personal Savings Rate is purple and line for Personal Consumption (Quarter-Over-Quarter Change) is dark green. Both lines were relatively steady up to 2Q20 as the coronavirus pandemic took hold of the economy. The Personal Savings Rate peaked in that quarter to 26.0% and the Consumption Rate Change decreased to the extremein 2Q20 then peaked the following quarter with a 10% increase. Both levels have returned to just slightly higher than normal levels in recent quarters. Chart source: Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis as of September 30, 2021.

The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in significant changes to, among a plethora of other things, consumer behavior in the United States. As a result of the virus outbreak in early 2020, the personal savings rate of domestic consumers saw a dramatic increase to a record high of 26.0% in the second quarter of last year. This propensity for conservativism during times of economic hardship can clearly be seen in our chart this week. Direct relief payments made to individuals as part of the government’s massive stimulus program were among the primary contributors to increased personal savings rates, as consumers saw limited opportunities to spend while in lockdown. As time went on, many individuals used excess savings to pay down debt and invest in equity markets, which helped fuel historic levels of retail trading activity. Online retail sales also increased a few months into the pandemic in large part due to pent-up demand, as indicated by the 10.0% quarter-over-quarter change in personal consumption during the third quarter of 2020.

With the holiday season upon us, many investors are curious about the state of the American consumer in light of the challenges posed by the last two years. On one hand, consumer balance sheets remain relatively strong. At the end of the third quarter of 2021, the personal savings rate in the United States was roughly 9.6%, well above the figure recorded at the end of 2019 of 7.4%. This likely means that individuals have more cash at their disposal than in previous years. At the same time, there are several headwinds facing consumers that may persist into the new year. Higher costs due to inflationary pressures and supply chain difficulties have already impacted a significant number of Americans and may cause a drop in consumer confidence if these issues are persistent in nature. The Omicron variant and other strains of the COVID-19 virus may also lead to renewed calls for economic shutdowns, which could leave consumers with fewer spending options. Finally, it is important to note that while the personal savings rate rose overall for consumers during the first several months of the pandemic, increased rates of savings were disproportionately attributed to higher-income individuals and households. This could mean that a large subset of the population is ill-equipped to deal with rising costs and, as a result, unable to spend at levels consistent with history. Ultimately, only time will tell how the American consumer will respond to ongoing uncertainty and whether governments and policymakers will see a need to provide additional economic relief. In light of the dynamics at play and the headwinds currently facing consumers, investors should remain realistic and pragmatic about spending levels heading into the final month of 2021.

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The opinions expressed herein are those of Marquette Associates, Inc. (“Marquette”), and are subject to change without notice. This material is not financial advice or an offer to purchase or sell any product. Marquette reserves the right to modify its current investment strategies and techniques based on changing market dynamics or client needs.

The opinions expressed herein are those of Marquette Associates, Inc. (“Marquette”), and are subject to change without notice. This material is not financial advice or an offer to purchase or sell any product. Marquette reserves the right to modify its current investment strategies and techniques based on changing market dynamics or client needs.

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