2021 Market Preview Video

January 21, 2021 | Greg Leonberger, FSA, EA, MAAA, Director of Research, Managing Partner

Graphic of darkened photo of city buildings, with guidance pattern overlay and "2021 Market Preview" in white.

This video coincides with our 2021 Market Preview newsletters and provides a high-level summary of each, including analysis of last year’s performance as well as trends, themes, opportunities, and risks to watch for in 2021.

Our Market Insights series examines the primary asset classes we cover for clients including the U.S. economy, fixed income, U.S. and non-U.S. equities, hedge funds, real estate, infrastructure, private equity, and private credit, with presentations by our research analysts and directors.

Featuring:
Greg Leonberger, FSA, EA, MAAA, Director of Research, Managing Partner
Brandon Von Feldt, CFA, Research Analyst
Ben Mohr, CFA, Director of Fixed Income
Colleen Flannery, Research Analyst, U.S. Equities
Evan Frazier, CAIA, Research Analyst, U.S. Equities
David Hernandez, CFA, Senior Research Analyst, Non-U.S.Equities
Joe McGuane, CFA, Senior Research Analyst, Alternatives
Will DuPree, Senior Research Analyst, Real Assets
Derek Schmidt, CFA, CAIA, Director of Private Equity
Brett Graffy, CAIA, Research Analyst

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The opinions expressed herein are those of Marquette Associates, Inc. (“Marquette”), and are subject to change without notice. This material is not financial advice or an offer to purchase or sell any product. Marquette reserves the right to modify its current investment strategies and techniques based on changing market dynamics or client needs. Marquette is an independent investment adviser registered under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940, as amended. Registration does not imply a certain level of skill or training. More information about Marquette including our investment strategies, fees, and objectives can be found in our ADV Part 2, which is available upon request.

Greg Leonberger, FSA, EA, MAAA
Director of Research, Managing Partner

Get to Know Greg

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